Characteristics and Systemic Risk Factors of Glaucoma in Adult Patients Attending a Private Eye Clinic in Aba, Nigeria

O. A. I. Otuka *

Department of Surgery, Ophthalmology Unit, Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba, Nigeria.

L. I. Eweputanna

Department of Radiology, Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba, Nigeria.

A. Kalu

Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria.

N. C. Ekeleme

Department of Community Medicine, Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba, Nigeria.

E. C. Iwuoha

Department of Community Medicine, Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba, Nigeria.

N. N. Kizor-Akaraiwe

Department of Ophthalmology, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital Parklane (ESUT), Enugu, Nigeria.

J. N. Ubah

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Osun Teaching Hospital (UTH), Osogbo, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Aim: This study aim to evaluate the characteristics and systemic risk factors of glaucoma in adult patients attending a private eye clinic in Aba, Nigeria.

Methodology: This study is a hospital-based research which utilized a cross-sectional design to evaluate the characteristics and systemic risk factors of glaucoma in adult patients attending a private specialist eye clinic in Aba, Nigeria, which provides comprehensive eye care services to a diverse population of patients over a period of 36 months. Adult patients who presented during the study period made up the study population. The Cochran formula was used to calculate a sample size of 220 patients, with a 5% margin of error and a 95% confidence level.

Results: The age distribution of the participants showed that older people had a higher prevalence of glaucoma, with 71.4% of the patients being 50 years of age or older. Male patients made up more of the study's patients (54.5%). A family ocular history was reported by 16.4% of the subjects, with parents being the most frequently impacted family members (59.5%). Hypertension (23.2%) and diabetes mellitus (5.9%) of all systemic disorders were the most common. Out of the 220 participants, 43.2% of them with glaucoma reported having symptoms for less than a year, 13.6% between one and two years, and 43.2% for more than two years. The two most typical co-existing eye diseases were cataracts (47.8%) and refractive problems (9.9%). The most common recorded intraocular pressure (IOP) was between 11-29mmHg. The visual acuity of the patients varied, with 33.6% and 37.7% of them having vision better than 6/18 in their right and left eyes, respectively. Age and different glaucoma types were shown to be significantly correlated in the study (p=0.020). Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) constituted 88% while primary angle closure (PACG) constituted 12%. Of the primary open angle glaucoma, 3.4% and normal tension glaucoma (NTG).

Conclusion: Significant risk factors for glaucoma noted in this study were age, family history of glaucoma and co-morbid conditions like hypertension and diabetes.This study advance our knowledge of the clinical traits and risk factors for glaucoma, which could help with early detection, treatment, and prevention methods.

Keywords: Characteristics, eye clinic, glaucoma, systemic risk factors


How to Cite

Otuka , O. A. I., Eweputanna , L. I., Kalu , A., Ekeleme , N. C., Iwuoha , E. C., Kizor-Akaraiwe , N. N., & Ubah , J. N. (2023). Characteristics and Systemic Risk Factors of Glaucoma in Adult Patients Attending a Private Eye Clinic in Aba, Nigeria. Asian Journal of Research and Reports in Ophthalmology, 6(1), 77–87. Retrieved from https://journalajrrop.com/index.php/AJRROP/article/view/82

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